Transgender Day of Remembrance 2013

This year the Transgender Day of Remembrance   (TDOR) is on Wednesday November 20th like it is ever year. TDOR serves as a day to memorialize those who have been killed as a result of anti-transgender violence, and acts to bring attention to continued violence against the trans* community.

TDOR over the past two years that this writer has personally been involved here in New York City its also been a coming out space for trans* and gender non-conforming people. It also becomes a place for us to discuss the transphobia we all experience but are lucky enough to survive. The Trans* sometimes uses this as a chance to sometimes teach the cisgendered community about us, who may have sadly not known their friend who was murdered was trans* or gender conforming.

This year events are happening all over New York City on the 20th and the day before. Tomorrow after I am part of a panel discussion at The College of Staten Island discussing my transition, the discrimination transmen face and whatever else the audience would like to ask me.

When did TDOR get started?

“ The Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDOR) was started by transgender advocate Gwendolyn Ann Smith as a vigil to honor the memory of Rita Hester, a transgender woman who was killed in 1998. The vigil commemorated all the transgender people lost to violence that year and began an important memorial that has become the annual Transgender Day of Remembrance.” GLAAD Website

How can I participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance?

Participate in the Transgender Day of Remembrance by attending or organizing a vigil on November 20 to honor all those whose lives were lost to anti-transgender violence that year.  Vigils are typically hosted by local transgender advocates or LGBT organizations, and held at community centers, parks, places of worship and other venues. The vigil often involves reading a list of the names of those who died that year.

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